Recognise

Recognise 2017-10-23T08:36:11+00:00

Understand the 7 types of domestic violence

It’s time we recognise all types of domestic violence for what they are.

Emotional Abuse

Blaming the victim for all problems in the relationship; constantly comparing the victim with others to undermine self-esteem and self-worth; sporadic sulking; withdrawing all interest and engagement (e.g. days or weeks of silence).

If you’ve noticed the violence, it’s time to respond.
Respond

Physical Abuse

Physical abuse includes directly assaulting the body; using weapons; driving dangerously; destructing property; abusing pets in front of family members; assaulting children; locking the victim out of the house; and depriving sleep.

If you’ve noticed the violence, it’s time to respond.
Respond

Sexual Abuse

Any form of forced sex or sexual degradation, such as sexual activity without consent; causing pain during sex; coercive sex without protection against pregnancy or sexually transmitted disease; making the victim perform sexual acts unwillingly; criticising, or using sexually degrading insults.

If you’ve noticed the violence, it’s time to respond.
Respond

Social Abuse

Systematic isolation from family and friends through techniques such as ongoing rudeness to family and friends; moving to locations where the victim knows nobody; and forbidding or physically preventing the victim from going out and meeting people — in effect, imprisonment.

If you’ve noticed the violence, it’s time to respond.
Respond

Spiritual Abuse

Denying access to ceremonies, land, or family; preventing religious observance; forcing victims to do things against their beliefs; denigration of cultural background; using religious teachings or cultural tradition as a reason for violence.

If you’ve noticed the violence, it’s time to respond.
Respond

Economic Abuse

Having complete control of all monies; granting no access to bank accounts; providing only an inadequate ‘allowance’; using any wages earned by the victim for household expenses.

If you’ve noticed the violence, it’s time to respond.
Respond

Verbal Abuse

Continual put-downs and humiliation, either privately or publicly, with attacks following clear themes that focus on intelligence, sexuality, body image, and capacity as a parent and spouse.

If you’ve noticed the violence, it’s time to respond.
Respond

Behind someone’s face, you might notice signs such as:

Unexplained injuries or numerous injuries.
Depression or withdrawal, or uncharacteristic outbursts and anger.
Frequently missing work, school, or social occasions without explanation.
Being increasingly isolated and cut off from family and friends.
Increased lack of confidence and self-esteem.
Changes to physical appearance (e.g. stops wearing make-up)
The need to always seek approval and permission from her partner before making a decision.
Often mentions her partner is ‘jealous’ or has a ‘bad temper’.
Criticised and/or humiliated by her partner in public.
recognise

If you’ve noticed the violence,
it’s time to respond.

Find out how to respond